Treaty Education

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

How could treaty education (truth, justice, reconciliation, decolonization, indigenization) look like in your classrooms, schools, homes & communities? What might the Treaty invitational event teach you about this important endeavour?

The purpose of teaching treaty education is to educate our students about the history of Canada, incorporate treaty education into the classroom through truth and reconciliation and implement the phrase “All Children Matter”.

I believe treaty education is about teaching children the value of treaties and the purposes they serve in the past, present, and future. Truth and reconciliation is only possible if people work together tell the truth. Truth in this case, meaning learning the history of Indigenous people and coming together to unpack the past and truly understand what happened. Reconciliation is about individuals coming together no matter what race, sexual orientation, gender or religion to promote healing and peace. If treaty education became normalized in the classroom, then I believe that the negative or racist comments may start to become eliminated for future generation.  Great success starts in small steps.

I will bring truth and reconciliation into my classroom by acknowledging the land we are on, making all students feel welcomed and included, hang the treaty flag, and incorporate Indigenous values into my lessons. I will ask for help when needed and work with my colleagues to promote an inclusive and supportive environment for my students.

“We are all treaty people” to me means that we are all apart of the journey to truth and reconciliation. We all have a part to play in healing and undoing the wrongs of the past. It is about coming together and creating a community of individuals who engage in understanding, forgiving, and healing. All people have to be involved to create a world of peace and harmony. It is standing together united and not separated. Treaty people means creating a world where everyone is loved and respected.  

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

Create your website at WordPress.com
Get started
%d bloggers like this: